Mean Business on North Ganson Street by S. Craig Zahler (a book blurt)

The writer of this book has also written and directed two movies – Bone Tomahawk and Brawl in Cell Block 99. His treatment of the book is not much different in how he evokes images of jarring violence and graphic gore. Here, such intensity is combined with snappy writing and colorful characters. The book tells a story about a disgraced detective, Jules Bettinger, who is transferred to the “armpit” of America. This is a place where crime is the mainstay; it’s safe to say the ratio of crime-fighters to criminals is comparable to one person’s chances of winning the lottery. Not wanting to see his family live in the same city where he works, Bettinger suffers daily through an 85-mile one-way commute from home to his “new” police headquarters.  But his work is even worse. He soon finds himself in trying to solve a double homicide that causes a string of events of increasing violent consequences and shocking climax.

This-is-My-Genre-Tell-Me-Yours Book Tag

I’ve been tagged by the ever-playful duo at Bookidote to do 

It’s a fairly new tag, created last October by blogger, The Tattooed Book Geek.  Although the rules listed below are simple, I’m making it even simpler by openly inviting everyone to join in this book tag.

THE RULES:

  • Credit Drew @ TheTattooedBookGeek as the creator of the tag, use the created tag name graphic, or create your own, and link back to his blog.
  • Answer the questions.
  • Tag as many people as you want.
  1. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE GENRE?
    I’m compelled to name two genres — thrillers and horror are what I read most these days. I don’t like using the word “favorite” because I also enjoy reading other genres. If I hadn’t read most of Ray Bradbury’s or Isaac Asimov’s books, I would say science fiction. Of course, there are many other good, contemporary science fiction writers out there too. (Besides science fiction, there were other years when I read mostly romance and then satirical fiction. I would go through periods of exhausting certain genres.) But, to keep this simple and easy, I’ve chosen the two genres I read the most, although I admit horror has remained a consistent favorite throughout my life.

  1. WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE AUTHOR FROM THE GENRE?
    I have too many authors I read and like. However, to keep it simple, I’ve shown below book titles by a thriller writer and a horror writer that come to mind right now. They are just two of my many “favorite” ones!

  1. WHAT IS IT ABOUT THE GENRE THAT KEEPS PULLING YOU BACK?
    The images, action, story lines that thrill, chill, and fill me with adrenaline.

  1. WHAT’S THE BOOK THAT STARTED YOUR LOVE FOR YOUR FAVORITE GENRE?
    Another tough one. So many of them. I’ll say that after reading so many horror books by various writers, I feel as if I’ve exhausted the library’s collection, so then I ventured toward thrillers. I’ve presented below the book titles that I remember reading decades ago.

    5. IF YOU HAD TO RECOMMEND AT LEAST ONE BOOK FROM YOUR FAVORITE GENRE TO A NON-READER/SOMEONE LOOKING TO START READING THAT GENRE, WHAT BOOK WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?
    I highly recommend the book titles shown below if you want to appreciate the thriller and horror genres.

    6. WHY DO YOU READ?
    I enjoy stories that suspend reality, enthrall, and entertain me. There are good storytellers out there, some with better writing skills than others, but the story lines are key. And I like to think that reading good writing will help make me a better writer, too.  I invite you to open the door to reading. You’ll be glad you did!

Childish Memories

Image: Pixabay

Jack is nimble,
Small as a thimble,
Just like his friend Tom,
Whose last name goes by Thumb.

Raining cats and dog,
Better than warts and hogs.
Though rain won’t go away,
Thinking of Rebecca’s sunny day.

Still with hundreds of kids
All crammed in a Keds,
That old woman makes enough soup
To last until they droop.

He goes by Rumpelstiltskin
With such an evil grin,
He’s known to be mischievous
And can be so devious.

Tales so wondrous,
Fond memories
Of my friends,
Invisibles and pretends.

After You by Jojo Moyes (a book blurt)

This is the sequel to Me Before You, which is about an ordinary young woman who goes through an extraordinary transformation after caring for a paraplegic young man with whom she falls in love. At first, After You feels almost anticlimactic because the first book was so intensely emotional; here we’re left to pick up the pieces. But then the plot begins to unfold into another love story. With humor interspersed with some serious themes like loss, separation, and abuse, the book makes for an interesting read. The movie, Me Before You, is now out, featuring Emilia Clarke, who plays the ordinary girl, Louisa Clark.  (I haven’t seen the movie, although I’ve heard it leaves out a serious theme that a movie understandably cannot cover well in a short time.)

[To read a review of Me Before You, check out Bookidote’s review.]