The Dragon Factory by Jonathan Maberry (a book blurt)

This is the second of a book series featuring Joe Ledger, a larger-than-life hero with amazing fighting skills. We are introduced to Ledger in Patient Zero, an action-packed thriller that hooked me to read more of the Ledger series. Although The Dragon Factory is only the second book I’ve read, I can see that the others will be just as fun because Ledger is a member of the “Department of Military Sciences,” a deep underground organization secretly sanctioned by the President of the United States. Ledger’s assignments basically result in saving us all from global destruction. What makes the series interesting are the kinds of evil created by misdirected geniuses. The Dragon Factory is about exotic transgenic monsters and cloning and the potential extinction of ethnic diversity.

I will update the Ledger book list below as I continue reading the series in the order written.

[Side note: My addiction to reading has intensified lately relative to writing and blogging. In time, I will get back to writing. . . I may sneak in a few posts here and there. . . but please keep checking in and reading prior content.]

 Patient Zero
The Dragon Factory

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Mean Business on North Ganson Street by S. Craig Zahler (a book blurt)

The writer of this book has also written and directed two movies – Bone Tomahawk and Brawl in Cell Block 99. His treatment of the book is not much different in how he evokes images of jarring violence and graphic gore. Here, such intensity is combined with snappy writing and colorful characters. The book tells a story about a disgraced detective, Jules Bettinger, who is transferred to the “armpit” of America. This is a place where crime is the mainstay; it’s safe to say the ratio of crime-fighters to criminals is comparable to one person’s chances of winning the lottery. Not wanting to see his family live in the same city where he works, Bettinger suffers daily through an 85-mile one-way commute from home to his “new” police headquarters.  But his work is even worse. He soon finds himself in trying to solve a double homicide that causes a string of events of increasing violent consequences and shocking climax.

This-is-My-Genre-Tell-Me-Yours Book Tag

I’ve been tagged by the ever-playful duo at Bookidote to do 

It’s a fairly new tag, created last October by blogger, The Tattooed Book Geek.  Although the rules listed below are simple, I’m making it even simpler by openly inviting everyone to join in this book tag.

THE RULES:

  • Credit Drew @ TheTattooedBookGeek as the creator of the tag, use the created tag name graphic, or create your own, and link back to his blog.
  • Answer the questions.
  • Tag as many people as you want.
  1. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE GENRE?
    I’m compelled to name two genres — thrillers and horror are what I read most these days. I don’t like using the word “favorite” because I also enjoy reading other genres. If I hadn’t read most of Ray Bradbury’s or Isaac Asimov’s books, I would say science fiction. Of course, there are many other good, contemporary science fiction writers out there too. (Besides science fiction, there were other years when I read mostly romance and then satirical fiction. I would go through periods of exhausting certain genres.) But, to keep this simple and easy, I’ve chosen the two genres I read the most, although I admit horror has remained a consistent favorite throughout my life.

  1. WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE AUTHOR FROM THE GENRE?
    I have too many authors I read and like. However, to keep it simple, I’ve shown below book titles by a thriller writer and a horror writer that come to mind right now. They are just two of my many “favorite” ones!

  1. WHAT IS IT ABOUT THE GENRE THAT KEEPS PULLING YOU BACK?
    The images, action, story lines that thrill, chill, and fill me with adrenaline.

  1. WHAT’S THE BOOK THAT STARTED YOUR LOVE FOR YOUR FAVORITE GENRE?
    Another tough one. So many of them. I’ll say that after reading so many horror books by various writers, I feel as if I’ve exhausted the library’s collection, so then I ventured toward thrillers. I’ve presented below the book titles that I remember reading decades ago.

    5. IF YOU HAD TO RECOMMEND AT LEAST ONE BOOK FROM YOUR FAVORITE GENRE TO A NON-READER/SOMEONE LOOKING TO START READING THAT GENRE, WHAT BOOK WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?
    I highly recommend the book titles shown below if you want to appreciate the thriller and horror genres.

    6. WHY DO YOU READ?
    I enjoy stories that suspend reality, enthrall, and entertain me. There are good storytellers out there, some with better writing skills than others, but the story lines are key. And I like to think that reading good writing will help make me a better writer, too.  I invite you to open the door to reading. You’ll be glad you did!

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter (a book blurt)

Another engrossing book by the author who wrote the “The Grant County” and “Will Trent” book series. All are thrillers and full of action, some more relentless than others, but they still make you grit your teeth. This newest installation is a standalone; it’s about two sisters who become estranged from each other because of a man, who marries one of them. More than 20 years later the two sisters reunite after the sister’s husband dies. Or does he? The widowed sister begins finding out disturbing things about her spouse, who had provided her with all her needs. Was he a genuinely loving and gentle man, or was he part of a secret pornographic ring? Full of graphic scenes and unbelievable depravity, the story makes you want to read through the night until your eyes can’t stay open anymore.

I’ve listed below, in the order they were published, the series and standalone books that I’ve read by this author. I will also continue to update the list below, as I continue reading her new publications.

The Grant County series
Blindsighted
Kisscut
A Faint Cold Fear
Indelible
Faithless
Beyond Reach

Will Trent series
Triptych
Fractured
Undone
Broken
Fallen
Snatched
Criminal
Busted
Unseen
The Kept Woman

Standalones
Coptown
Pretty Girls
The Good Daughter
Pieces of Her (2018)

The Dead Student by John Katzenbach (a book review)

This is a book about revenge and retribution with damaged characters trying to find ways to cope. The main character, Timothy “Moth” Warner is a PhD student and a recovering alcoholic whose sponsor is his uncle, Dr. Edward Warner, a psychiatrist. Warner, a veteran alcoholic himself who was nearly 7,000 days sober (more or less) is found dead. Cause of death is ruled a suicide, the final conclusion based on evidence. But Moth doesn’t believe it because he knows his uncle would never desert him; he was not suicidal and he had too much good in his life to live for. And so, the search for the truth begins . . . Continue reading